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General Formatting

Overview

This section of the Kupu tutorial discusses the use of general formatting techniques including:

All of these things are controlled by Kupu's formatting bar.  (Click on the figure below to enlarge it.)

Kupu's formatting toolbar

Styles

To use Kupu properly, it is important to understand how it manages text.  Like word processors such as OpenOffice Writer or Microsoft Word, Kupu organizes a page into a set of text blocks, each with an associated style.  The style defines the default properties for the characters within the text block such as:

  • The font name (Arial, Times New Roman, Serif, etc.)
  • The font size (10 point, 12 pitch, 6 em, etc.)
  • The font color (blue, gold, etc.)
  • The type face (normal, bold, italic, etc.)
  • The border of the block (e.g., the entire text block may be surrounded by a thin line)
  • Many other things

It is important to remember that each and every text block has an associated style, and any text within the block that does not have any specific format such as bold or italics applied to it will inherit the properties defined for the style.  Below are examples of three of the many styles available.

Here is an example of the "Literlal" style.  It uses a monospaced, black font, on a light
blue background, and there is a darker blue border around the outer edge of the light
blue background.  Additionally, a block of text that is longer than a single line is not
wrapped to the next line.  Instead, a horizontal scrollbar appears allow the user to shift
the text left and right.  (Note that when printing, this text is not wrapped.Instead, it is
truncated.)  Therefore, when using the "Literal" style, you may wish to insert line breaks
if you think users may wish to print the page.

Here is an example of the "Normal Paragraph" style.  It uses a proportionally spaced, black font on a white background.  Additionally, a block of text that is longer than a single line is automatically wrapped to the next line.

Here is an example of the "Discrete" style.  It uses a proportionally spaced, grey font on a white background.  Additionally, a block of text that is longer than a single line is automatically wrapped to the next line.

Note that in each of the examples above, the style name itself is bolded, so it looks a bit different than the rest of its example, but all other characters in the block adhere strictly to the attributes of the block's style.

What Separates One Block from Another?

x

Changing the Style of a Text Block

Since every text block must have a style associated with it, it is very easy to change the style of the block.  Simply place the cursor anywhere inside the text block, click the style drop-down box (Style drop-down), and select the desired style.

  • Caution users about certain styles.
  • Talk about how to change styles in a <br> section (Firefox only).
  • Talk about the "<no style>" problem (Firefox only).

To Bold or Not to Bold

So it's time to place a header or subheader into a page,, and you are faced with a dilemma:

  1. Should you type the header and change the style to "Heading 1" ("Heading 2," etc.)?
  2. Or should you type the header, highlight the text, and click the Bold button (Bold button)?

Fortunately, there is only one good answer to this question:  Change the style to "Heading 1" (or whatever heading level is appropriate).  Although visually, selecting the second option may address your immediate needs, there are numerous advantages to selecting the first option.

  1. uniform style across the website (expand)
  2. ability to anchor within the document (expand)
  3. ability to anchor from another document (expand)
  4. table of contents (expand)
  5. ... (others?)

Bold and Italicized Text

Before using bold on an entire line, consider the reason you are doing it.  If you're attempting to create a heading, for example, there are numerous reasons discussed in the Style Application section above to use a style instead.

xBold button

xItalic button

Subscripts and Superscripts

x

xSubscript button

xSuperscript button

Line Justification (Left, Right and Center)

x

xLeft justify button

xCenter justify button

xRight justify button

Other Editor Features

xSave button

xUndo button

xRedo button

xHTML button

x

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